Go For It

Encountering a stranger who knows more about your life than he should is eerie.  Well, I don’t mean to startle you, but I do know a private fact about you.  I know that you are weighing up a decision in your life.

To be sure, I do not know any details.  I have no idea whether you are considering a geographic move, a job change, an investment, or whether you are considering a family or medical decision, but there is certainly some fork in the road that you are confronting.  And because I am quite ignorant of your particular situation, I am unable to advise any specifics.

However, I can help you focus some ancient Jewish wisdom onto your predicament.  This will help illuminate your direction just as focusing a flashlight in a dark forest at night reveals previously unseen paths.

Let’s start with the very first Biblical indication that Abraham is someone special.  It is the life-challenge described in this verse:

And God said to Abram, Go for yourself out of your country and from your birthplace…

 (Genesis 12:1)

This new directive sets Abraham’s life on course. 

This is the first in a succession of challenges throughout Abraham’s life.  His final life-challenge is the sacrifice of Isaac.

Take your son, your only son, whom you love, Isaac, and go for yourself to the land of Moriah …

(Genesis 22:2)

I want you to observe that both Abraham’s first challenge and his final challenge are presented in terms of “Go for yourself.”

In the Lord’s language, that recurring phrase of two Hebrew words, pronounced as LeCH  LeCHa, looks like this:

Though pronounced slightly differently, you can see that the two Hebrew words “Go” and “For Yourself” are actually one and the same.

What a brilliantly incandescent insight!  God is saying to Abraham, “Whatever I command you to do, every challenge I lay in your path, step forward to meet it FOR YOUR OWN BENEFIT.  Do not do it just to please me—know that there is also value in it for you.” Unlike the gods of Greek mythology, God’s directives aren’t capricious. 

Back now to whatever crossroads you are confronting. We know that God does not always indicate to us the path He wants us to take.  Our Heavenly Father often stands back, granting us the privilege of making our own choices just as parents train a child to make its own decisions. 

Clearly, whenever a forthcoming decision torments us it is one of those occasions when the Good Lord is encouraging us to grow.  We should embrace the challenge promptly. 

The lesson of one word meaning both “Go” and “For Yourself”, is that generally, making a decision is better than procrastination. Obviously, I’m not talking about reckless, impulsive or rebellious choices. But if you are acting maturely, in good faith, a wrong decision is usually better than no decision.

Boaters like me know that when you’re stationary, your rudder is useless.  You have no control.  Moving in the wrong direction is better than not moving, because you have momentum to correct course.

Here are three steps to overcome inertia.  Start by analyzing the pros and cons of each choice.  Then, absorb the emotional imperative to step off the high diving board. After all, no one would get married, have children or start a business if they required an ironclad guarantee of success.  Finally, deploy your power of faith to step forward. There is genuine joy in confronting decisions.  We should stride forth with a debonair smile on our face and calm confidence in our hearts. 

Each of the resources that I make available at my web store is intended to give you the tools necessary for these three steps. They help you understand how the world really works by providing understanding of the user manual, the Bible.  My products provide practical wisdom to benefit your family, faith, friendships and fortune. I  sincerely appreciate each and every purchase, which allows me to produce more materials, making possible my life mission of sharing ancient Jewish wisdom.

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